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GB 6040 - Marketing Management (Evans)

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Library Basics

Welcome to the library's Research Guide for Professor Evans' Marketing Management course.  Please use the resources and links provided to complete your research.  If you have any questions, please ask

Research Assistance

Library staff members are always willing and eager to help you with your assignments.  Please contact us by email, phone, or text message, and we will respond to your questions as soon as possible.

General Email: library@delval.edu
Call or Text: 215-709-8851

Or, contact Elise Georgulis, Graduate Studies Librarian, directly.

Email: elise.georgulis@delval.edu
Phone: 215-489-2386

Business Plan Help

A variety of business plans and marketing plans are available on the Internet. Here are some sites to visit for help with writing and developing your plan.

Defining Your Target Market

What This Means

Getting specific about your target market allows you to decide how you want to focus your marketing efforts. It does not exclude potential customers. In order to define your target market, you want to consider demographic and psychographic factors. 

With this in mind, try to narrow down which potential consumers would be most interested in your product or service.

Choosing Demographics to Target

Demographics are facts about certain groups. This data is useful to develop a bsic profile of your consumer.

  • age
  • ethnicity
  • education level
  • gender
  • income
  • location
  • marital/family status
  • occupation

Resources to Consider

American FactFinder, from the Census Bureau, provides Census data through a data platform.

Basic Family Budget Calculator, from the Economic Policy Institute, generates itemized budgets for families of different sizes in over 400 metropolitan areas.

City-Data.com consolidates profiles of towns and cities, including crime data, housing, businesses, political contributions, weather, hospitals, schools, libraries, as well as race, income, ancestries, education, employment statistics on the residents.

Community Demographics Library, from Development Alliance, offers metro area, county, and state data on population, employment, income, and expenditures.

Harris Polls provide summaries of consumer opinion polls, some of which deal with consumption or shopping patterns.

Market Research Findings, compiled by the Market Research Portal, offers general reports.

Pew Internet publishes reports regarding internet use among various demographics. 

You Are Where You Live, from Claritas, has a ZIP code lookup site with neighborhood lifestyle segmentation information.

Examining Psychographic Factors

Psychographics are things more commonly referred to as "culture." Popular psychographic groups would include Baby Boomers or Millenials. Psychographics data is helpful to develop a clearer profile of your consumer.

  • attitude
  • behavior
  • interests/hobbies
  • lifestyle
  • personality
  • values

Resources to Consider

You Are Where You Live, from Claritas, has a ZIP code lookup site with 66 distinct lifestyle types.

Consumer Expenditure Survey, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics.

Survey of Consumers, from University of Michigan, offers registered users access to national data collection and an analysis of social science data.

Example:

Here is an example from Inc.com:

An interior design company could choose to market to homeowners between the ages of 35-65 with incomes of $150,000+ in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana, market. To define the market even further, the company could choose to target only those interested in kitchen and bath remodeling and traditional styles. This market could be broken down into two niches: parents on the go and retiring baby boomers.

Determining Industry Trends

Industry Overview

Hoover's and Mergent Intellect is a Dun & Bradstreet's database of company and industry profiles which include company financial data, industry growth rates, and competitive landscape statistics.

Reference USA is a directory of more than 20 million U.S. businesses, searchable by zipcode.

Government Resources

Industry Statistics Portal, from the US Census Bureau, has many different data sets. You will need to know the NAICS (North American Industry Classification System) code for your industry.

Industry and Analysis, by the International Trade Administration, includes industry specific trade data.

County Business Patterns, U.S. Census Bureau,  lists the number of establishments with employees by industry, Metro area and ZIP code.

Nonemployer Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau, provides information on business without paid employees.

More Information

American Demographics offers recent articles on consumer and demographic trends.

Facts for Features & Special Editions, from the U.S. Census Bureau, informs people around the world about population, health, and the environmentfor the well-being of current and future generations.

Harris Interactive: Harris Vault coms over 40 years of The Harris Poll, with a search function to uncover data spanning subject matter and industry.

Library of Research Articles, from Market Research Portal, include topics from all over the marketing and business sector.

Monthly Trend Briefings, from trendwatching.com, surveys 180+ countries to understand the new consumer and discover innovation opportunities.

Population Reference Bureau creates articles and reports on topics such as employment, income/poverty, race/ethnicity, and youth.

Online Resources

Industry Databases

Journal Articles

Law Resources

What is Interlibrary Loan?

Interlibrary Loan, also called ILL, is a free service for you as a student to use if you need an article or book that we do not own. 

  • If the resource you need is a journal article, check our Journal List to see if we have access to the journal.
  • Check the Book/DVD Catalog if the resource is a book or DVD.

To initiate an Interlibrary Loan request, please use the form on the Interlibrary loan page with as much information about the resource as possible, as well as your contact information. 

Image from https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/83/b8/4f/83b84f9bcafe4cc7bc91aae76fbc53d6.jpg


 

Marketing Plan Websites

Access to Industry Profiles and Codes

Suggestions for Business Financing

RefWorks

RefWorks

RefWorks is a new way to collect, manage, and organize research.  You can read, annotate, organize, and cite your research as well as collaborate by sharing collections.

From simple bibliographies to papers formatted with in-text citations or footnotes, RefWorks handles it all. ​To learn more about RefWorks, use our RefWorks research guide.

To create a RefWorks account:

  1. Go to the link below and click Use login from my institution
  2. Fill in your information, making sure to use your DelVal email address.  
  3. Go to your inbox and click the email link to complete the activation process. 

Already have an account? Just go to the link below and click "Log In"

Online Tutorials

RefWorks screencasts are available 24/7 on ProQuest's YouTube Channel. 

Click here to begin watching.

Formatting your Bibliography

7th EDITION

Please note, the 7th edition of the APA includes some changes from the previous edition. Changes are indicated below by highlight.

Paper Formatting

A title page is required for all APA Style papers, unless noted otherwise by your professor. Students should follow the guidelines fo their instructor when determining which title page format is mst appropriate to use. If not instructed otherwise, students should include the following elements on the title page. 

NOTE: Student title pages do not require a running head, unlike a professional title page. 

Title
Name 
University attended, including department or division
Course number and name
Instructor name
Assignment due date

In-Text Citations

Paraphrasing

When the author's name appears in the sentence, it does not need to be repeated in the citation.

Example: 
Recent literature has examined long-run price drifts following initial public offerings and other factors (Luna, 2020).
Luna (2020) reaches more or less the same conclusion.

Two or more sources within same parentheses

Order the citations of two or more works by different authors within the same parentheses alphabetically in the same order in which they appear in the reference list (including citations that would otherwise shorten to et al.). Separate the citations with semicolons. 

Example: 
Several studies (Adams et al., 2019; Shumway & Shulman, 2015; Westinghouse, 2017))...


Quotations

Example:

For people with osteoarthritis, "painful joints should be moved through a full range of motion every day to maintain flexibility and to slow deterioration of cartilage" (Flores, 2019, p. 20). 
(Gecht-Silver & Duncombe, 2015, p. 210) 


More than three authors

Example:
(Smith et al., 2014, p. 203)


No author
(Title Page #)

Example: 
(Plagiarism and You 1942) 
("Five Ways to Protect Yourself" 1993)


No page number

Because the material does not include page numbers, you can include any of the following in the text to cite the quotation:

  • A paragraph number, if provided; alternatively, you could count paragraphs down from the beginning of the document.
  • An overarching heading plus a paragraph number within that section.
  • A short title in quotation marks, in cases in which the heading is too unwieldy to cite in full.

Example:

(Anderson, 2013, para. 1).

Reference List

Start the reference list on a new page after the txt and before any tables, figures, and/or appendices. Label the reference list "References," capitalized, in bold, and centered.

Double-space all reference list entries (including between and within references). 

Use a hanging indent for all references, meaning that the first line of each reference is flush left and subsequent lines are indented by 0.5 in. 

Works are listed in alphabetical order by the last name of the first listed author. 

Journal Articles

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Article title, sentence style capitalization. Journal title, volume(issue, if available), pages. URL, if no DOI available

Example:

 Ahmann, E. (2018). A descriptive review of ADHD coaching research: Implications for college students. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 31(1), 17-39. https://www.ahead.org/professional-resources/publications/jped/archived-jped/jped-volume-31


Journal article with multiple authors

 Last name, Initials., & Last name, Initials. (Year). Article title, sentence style capitalization. Journal title, volume(issue, if available), pages. URL, if no DOI available

Example: 

 McCauley, S. M., & Christiansen, M. H. (2019). Language learning as language use: A cross-linguistic model of child language development. Psychological Review, 126(1), 1-51. https://doi.org/10.1037/rev0000126

When a source has twenty-two or more authors, include first twenty-one … last listed author.

Example: 

Kalnay, E., Kanamitsu, M., Kitler, R., Collins, W., Deaven, D., Gandin, L., Iredell, M., Saha, S., White, G., Woolen, J., Zhu, Y., Chelliah, M., Ebisuzaki, W., Higgins, W., Janowiak, J., Mo, K. C., Ropelewski, C., Wang, J., Leetman, A., . . . Joseph, D. (1996). The NCEP/NCAR 40-year reanalysis project. Bulletin of the americna Meteorological Society, 77(3), 437-471. http://doi.org/fg6rf9

Books

 Last name, Intials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization. Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Burgess, R. (2019). rethinking global health: Frameworks of power. Routledge. 


Books with multiple authors

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization (edition, if available). Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Christian, B., & Griffiths, T. (2016). algorithms to live by: The computer science of human decisions. Henry Holt and Co.


Chapter in edited book

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Chapter title, sentence style capitalization. In Editor (eds.), Title, sentence style capitalization (pages). Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Weinstock, R., Leong, G., & Silva, J. A. (2003). Defining forensic psychiatry: Roles and responsibilities. In R. Rosner (Ed.), Principles and practice of forensic psychiatry (2nd ed., pp. 7-13). CRC Press. 

Court Decisions

Name v. Name, Volume Source Page (Court Date)

Example:

Lessard v. Schmidt, 349 F. Supp. 1078 (E.D. Wis. 1972)


In-Text Citation 

To cite the reference in text, give the case name, in italics, and the year.

Name v. Name (Year)
(Name v. Name, Year)

Example:

Lessard v. Schmidt (1972)
(Lessard v. Schmidt, 1972)

Federal Statutes

​In APA Style, most legal materials are cited in the standard legal citation style used for legal references across all disciplines.

A statute is a law or act passed by a legislative body. As with court decisions, statutes exist on both the federal and state levels, such as an act by Congress or by a state government. 

Name of Act, Title Source § Section Number (Year). URL

Example:

Every Student Succeeds Act, 20 U.S.C. § 6301 (2015). https://www.congress.gov/114/plaws/publ95/PLAW-114publ95.pdf


In-Text Citation 
The in-text citation format for a federal statute is similar to that for other APA Style references. Cite the name of the statute and the year.

Example:

Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (2006)
(Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, 2006)

Government Reports

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization (Report number, if available). Publisher's name.URL. 

Example:

 National Cancer Institute. (2018). Facing forward: Life after cancer treatment (NIH Publication No. 18-2424). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/life-after-treatment.pdf

Law Review

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization. Journal name, volume, starting page. 

Example:

 Martin, L. H. (1991). Case worker liability for the negligent handling of child abuse reports. University of Cincinnati Law Review, 60, 191.

Newspaper Articles

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year, month day). Title, sentence style capitalization. Newspaper name. URL

Example:

 Guariano, B. (2017), December 4). How will humanity react to alien life? Psychologists have some predictions. The Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/12/04/how-will-humanity-react-to-alien-life-psychologists-have-some-predictions

Websites

 Author or organization name. (Date of publication, if available). Webpage title. URL

Example:

 Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, January 23). People at high risk of developing flu-related complications. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm


When no date is listed

 Author or organization name. (n.d.). Webpage title. URL

Example:

 National Nurses United. (n.d.). What employers should do to protect nurses from Zika. https://www.nationalnursesunited.org/pages/what-employers-should-do-to-protect-rns-from-zika

Is the example you need missing?

Contact the Library at library@delval.edu to request a new example and citation help!

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Elise Georgulis
Contact:
Graduate Studies Librarian
elise.georgulis@delval.edu
215-489-2386 (library)
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