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Master's in Management & Organizational Leadership

Finding Research

Welcome!

Welcome to the Research Guide for Delaware Valley University's Masters in Management. Please use the menu to navigate. Contact Elise Georgulis, Graduate Studies Librarian, with any questions.

Research Assistance

Librarians are always willing and eager to help you with your assignments.  Please contact us by email, phone, or text message, and we will respond to your questions as soon as possible.

General Email: library@delval.edu
​Call or Text: 215-709-8851

Elise Georgulis, Graduate Studies Librarian, contact info:
elise.georgulis@delval.edu
215-489-2386

Graduate Interlibrary Loans

Interlibrary Loan, also called ILL, is a free service for you as a student to use if you need an article or book that we do not own. 

  • If the resource you need is a journal article, check our Journal List to see if we have access to the journal.
  • Check the Book/DVD Catalog if the resource is a book or DVD.

To initiate an Interlibrary Loan request, fill out the form with as much information about the resource as possible, as well as your contact information. 

Password Problems?

When prompted to login to library databases, your username and password are the same as your myDelVal credentials. If your credentials are not working, contact the Help Desk at 215-489-4357.

Try these databases first:

Law

Evaluating Resources

Types of resources

When evaluating resources, it is important to understand the difference between popular, scholarly, and trade journal articles.

A popular article is one in a magazine, written for entertainment for a general audience. The author’s credentials are unknown, if an author is provided.

A scholarly article, also known as a peer-reviewed or academic article, is written by an expert in that field. There might be a peer-reviewed date on the first page, letting you see when the journal accepted the article. These articles should be about a study accomplished by the authors, or a review of studies (known as a review article).

A trade journal article is within a trade journal/trade publication. These articles are written by experts in that industry, but often are not studies and are not considered scholarly. They provide news on the industry, explore trends, and gather expert opinions.

*Trade journals are the most popular for business and management topics. Expect many, if not most, of your resources to be from trade journals!

Scholarly, trade, or popular?

Is it a Scholarly, Trade, or Popular Publication?

Evaluation Criteria

Scholarly Journal (also called Peer Reviewed or Refereed)

Technical/Trade Journal

Popular Magazine

What’s in them?

Articles that present original research studies. Reviews of books relevant to scholars in the discipline.

Practical information for professionals in the field, including news, trends, and other updates.

Articles (usually brief) that feature a variety of topics -- including news, sports, short stories, art, fashion, etc.

 

Language is very technical, and article authors assume some scholarly background of the reader.

Articles are generally brief and the language is straightforward, but may contain professional jargon.

Bonus: Trade publications often include job listings.

Articles are written in simple language—no specialized knowledge is needed in order to read an article.

Examples

AJS, Bildhaan, JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, Social Science Quarterly

Architectural Record, Ceramics Monthly, The Police Chief, Instructor

Rolling Stone, The Economist, Time, Vogue, Sports Illustrated, and Psychology Today.

Who writes for them?

An expert or team of experts in the particular topic of study (Ph.D., researcher, or other scholar).

Professionals or experts in the field.

Writers, usually professional journalists, who are not necessarily experts on the article's topic.

 

Author’s credentials are usually listed with article.

Author’s credentials are usually listed with article.

Author’s information is often listed on the editorial page of the magazine. Sometimes the authors are not named.

Do they cite their sources?

Sources and references are always cited in scholarly articles—with footnotes or a bibliography.

Sometimes sources and bibliographies are given. This varies depending on the publication.

Articles rarely, if ever, cite resources in a bibliography.

What’s their purpose?

To make the information available to the rest of the scholarly world.

Report on trends in the profession and give practical advice to professionals and other interested readers.

To entertain, provide news, provide information about a hobby or special interest (e.g., gardening, motorcycles) promote a viewpoint, or sell a product.

What do they look like?

Scholarly journals generally have a basic, serious look and often contain many graphs and charts but few glossy pages or colorful pictures.

Trade journals often look more like popular magazines, with glossy pictures. Articles may have graphs and charts. The ads are usually related to the trade.

Glossy and attention-grabbing! Generally contain photos, perfume samples, and lots of advertisements.

What is their review process?

Scholarly articles go through a peer review (referee) process where other scholars in the field evaluate the content of the article. The articles are edited for grammar, format, etc.

Articles are reviewed by the magazine’s editorial staff, including copyediting for spelling, grammar, etc. Some trade journal articles go through some sort of peer review process—see the publication’s website (or editorial page) to find out.

Articles are reviewed by the magazine’s editorial staff, including copyediting for spelling, grammar, etc.

Chart from Hunter Library at Western Carolina University.  (Chart design inspired by many library charts including Colorado State University Libraries and Springfield Township Virtual Library. Explanation based on Cornell University Library "Skill Guide No. 20")

Formatting your Bibliography

APA Style Citation Examples

In-Text Citations

Paraphrasing

When the author's name appears in the sentence, it does not need to be repeated in the citation.

Example: 
Recent literature has examined long-run price drifts following initial public offerings and other factors (Luna, 2020).
Luna (2020) reaches more or less the same conclusion.

Two or more sources within same parentheses

Order the citations of two or more works by different authors within the same parentheses alphabetically in the same order in which they appear in the reference list (including citations that would otherwise shorten to et al.). Separate the citations with semicolons. 

Example: 
Several studies (Adams et al., 2019; Shumway & Shulman, 2015; Westinghouse, 2017))...


Quotations

Example:

For people with osteoarthritis, "painful joints should be moved through a full range of motion every day to maintain flexibility and to slow deterioration of cartilage" (Flores, 2019, p. 20). 
(Gecht-Silver & Duncombe, 2015, p. 210) 


More than three authors

Example:
(Smith et al., 2014, p. 203)


No author
(Title Page #)

Example: 
(Plagiarism and You 1942) 
("Five Ways to Protect Yourself" 1993)


No page number

Because the material does not include page numbers, you can include any of the following in the text to cite the quotation:

  • A paragraph number, if provided; alternatively, you could count paragraphs down from the beginning of the document.
  • An overarching heading plus a paragraph number within that section.
  • A short title in quotation marks, in cases in which the heading is too unwieldy to cite in full.

Example:

(Anderson, 2013, para. 1).

More APA Examples

7th EDITION

Please note, the 7th edition of the APA includes some changes from the previous edition. Changes are indicated below by highlight.

Paper Formatting

A title page is required for all APA Style papers, unless noted otherwise by your professor. Students should follow the guidelines fo their instructor when determining which title page format is mst appropriate to use. If not instructed otherwise, students should include the following elements on the title page. 

NOTE: Student title pages do not require a running head, unlike a professional title page. 

Title
Name 
University attended, including department or division
Course number and name
Instructor name
Assignment due date

In-Text Citations

Paraphrasing

When the author's name appears in the sentence, it does not need to be repeated in the citation.

Example: 
Recent literature has examined long-run price drifts following initial public offerings and other factors (Luna, 2020).
Luna (2020) reaches more or less the same conclusion.

Two or more sources within same parentheses

Order the citations of two or more works by different authors within the same parentheses alphabetically in the same order in which they appear in the reference list (including citations that would otherwise shorten to et al.). Separate the citations with semicolons. 

Example: 
Several studies (Adams et al., 2019; Shumway & Shulman, 2015; Westinghouse, 2017))...


Quotations

Example:

For people with osteoarthritis, "painful joints should be moved through a full range of motion every day to maintain flexibility and to slow deterioration of cartilage" (Flores, 2019, p. 20). 
(Gecht-Silver & Duncombe, 2015, p. 210) 


More than three authors

Example:
(Smith et al., 2014, p. 203)


No author
(Title Page #)

Example: 
(Plagiarism and You 1942) 
("Five Ways to Protect Yourself" 1993)


No page number

Because the material does not include page numbers, you can include any of the following in the text to cite the quotation:

  • A paragraph number, if provided; alternatively, you could count paragraphs down from the beginning of the document.
  • An overarching heading plus a paragraph number within that section.
  • A short title in quotation marks, in cases in which the heading is too unwieldy to cite in full.

Example:

(Anderson, 2013, para. 1).

Reference List

Start the reference list on a new page after the txt and before any tables, figures, and/or appendices. Label the reference list "References," capitalized, in bold, and centered.

Double-space all reference list entries (including between and within references). 

Use a hanging indent for all references, meaning that the first line of each reference is flush left and subsequent lines are indented by 0.5 in. 

Works are listed in alphabetical order by the last name of the first listed author. 

Journal Articles

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Article title, sentence style capitalization. Journal title, volume(issue, if available), pages. URL, if no DOI available

Example:

 Ahmann, E. (2018). A descriptive review of ADHD coaching research: Implications for college students. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 31(1), 17-39. https://www.ahead.org/professional-resources/publications/jped/archived-jped/jped-volume-31


Journal article with multiple authors

 Last name, Initials., & Last name, Initials. (Year). Article title, sentence style capitalization. Journal title, volume(issue, if available), pages. URL, if no DOI available

Example: 

 McCauley, S. M., & Christiansen, M. H. (2019). Language learning as language use: A cross-linguistic model of child language development. Psychological Review, 126(1), 1-51. https://doi.org/10.1037/rev0000126

When a source has twenty-two or more authors, include first twenty-one … last listed author.

Example: 

Kalnay, E., Kanamitsu, M., Kitler, R., Collins, W., Deaven, D., Gandin, L., Iredell, M., Saha, S., White, G., Woolen, J., Zhu, Y., Chelliah, M., Ebisuzaki, W., Higgins, W., Janowiak, J., Mo, K. C., Ropelewski, C., Wang, J., Leetman, A., . . . Joseph, D. (1996). The NCEP/NCAR 40-year reanalysis project. Bulletin of the americna Meteorological Society, 77(3), 437-471. http://doi.org/fg6rf9

Books

 Last name, Intials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization. Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Burgess, R. (2019). rethinking global health: Frameworks of power. Routledge. 


Books with multiple authors

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization (edition, if available). Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Christian, B., & Griffiths, T. (2016). algorithms to live by: The computer science of human decisions. Henry Holt and Co.


Chapter in edited book

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Chapter title, sentence style capitalization. In Editor (eds.), Title, sentence style capitalization (pages). Publisher's name. 

Example:

 Weinstock, R., Leong, G., & Silva, J. A. (2003). Defining forensic psychiatry: Roles and responsibilities. In R. Rosner (Ed.), Principles and practice of forensic psychiatry (2nd ed., pp. 7-13). CRC Press. 

Court Decisions

Name v. Name, Volume Source Page (Court Date)

Example:

Lessard v. Schmidt, 349 F. Supp. 1078 (E.D. Wis. 1972)


In-Text Citation 

To cite the reference in text, give the case name, in italics, and the year.

Name v. Name (Year)
(Name v. Name, Year)

Example:

Lessard v. Schmidt (1972)
(Lessard v. Schmidt, 1972)

Federal Statutes

​In APA Style, most legal materials are cited in the standard legal citation style used for legal references across all disciplines.

A statute is a law or act passed by a legislative body. As with court decisions, statutes exist on both the federal and state levels, such as an act by Congress or by a state government. 

Name of Act, Title Source § Section Number (Year). URL

Example:

Every Student Succeeds Act, 20 U.S.C. § 6301 (2015). https://www.congress.gov/114/plaws/publ95/PLAW-114publ95.pdf


In-Text Citation 
The in-text citation format for a federal statute is similar to that for other APA Style references. Cite the name of the statute and the year.

Example:

Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (2006)
(Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, 2006)

Government Reports

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization (Report number, if available). Publisher's name.URL. 

Example:

 National Cancer Institute. (2018). Facing forward: Life after cancer treatment (NIH Publication No. 18-2424). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/life-after-treatment.pdf

Law Review

 Last name, Initials. (Year). Title, sentence style capitalization. Journal name, volume, starting page. 

Example:

 Martin, L. H. (1991). Case worker liability for the negligent handling of child abuse reports. University of Cincinnati Law Review, 60, 191.

Newspaper Articles

 Last name, Initials, & Last name, Initials. (Year, month day). Title, sentence style capitalization. Newspaper name. URL

Example:

 Guariano, B. (2017), December 4). How will humanity react to alien life? Psychologists have some predictions. The Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/12/04/how-will-humanity-react-to-alien-life-psychologists-have-some-predictions

Websites

 Author or organization name. (Date of publication, if available). Webpage title. URL

Example:

 Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, January 23). People at high risk of developing flu-related complications. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm


When no date is listed

 Author or organization name. (n.d.). Webpage title. URL

Example:

 National Nurses United. (n.d.). What employers should do to protect nurses from Zika. https://www.nationalnursesunited.org/pages/what-employers-should-do-to-protect-rns-from-zika

Is the example you need missing?

Contact the Library at library@delval.edu to request a new example and citation help!

Setting up RefWorks

RefWorks

RefWorks is a new way to collect, manage, and organize research.  You can read, annotate, organize, and cite your research as well as collaborate by sharing collections.

From simple bibliographies to papers formatted with in-text citations or footnotes, RefWorks handles it all. ​To learn more about RefWorks, use our RefWorks research guide.

To create a RefWorks account:

  1. Go to the link below and click Use login from my institution
  2. Fill in your information, making sure to use your DelVal email address.  
  3. Go to your inbox and click the email link to complete the activation process. 

Already have an account? Just go to the link below and click "Log In"

Setting your citation style to APA 7th

Setting your Citation Style to APA 7th 

As a RefWorks user, you can set your profile to reflect resources and create bibliographies using the APA 7th - Sentence Casing, DOI: https://doi.org/ 

NOTE: There are citation style variations of APA 7th available to choose from in RefWorks so please select and apply the following version: APA 7th - Sentence Casing, DOI: https://doi.org/

To set and update your citation style, select the All References tab on the left menu, and change the View display on your RefWorks dashboard to Citation View. Click on the settings gear Settings Gear in RefWorks. Search for and select the APA 7th - Sentence Casing, DOI: https://doi.org/ and click Save.

RefWorks Citation View

 

Text and images from Northcentral University Library

Getting Help

Graduate Studies Librarian

Elise Georgulis's picture
Elise Georgulis
Contact:
Graduate Studies Librarian
elise.georgulis@delval.edu
215-489-2386 (library)
I am currently meeting with graduate students via Zoom. Please send me an email to set up an appointment.

Leading & Organizing Teams Case Report

Assignment

For this assignment (guidelines and structure provided by Prof. Seel), you are to write a report as a management consultant sharing a challenge or issue. This business document is to be written for a professional audience, and the final report might consist of recommendations or a case study. Detailed below is information regarding your references.

The assignment guidelines explain "you must use at least 3 peer-reviewed sources in your report. All sources must be cited and referenced in APA format... You should not format the paper itself in APA format... Follow APA for in-text citations and references only." (Please see complete guidelines for all assignment details). Click "Formatting your Bibliography," and "More APA Examples" for APA citation assistance.

Here is a list of top rated peer reviewed business and leadership journals we carry at the library. If you click on the journal's link, you will be taken to a database to search within the journal. Please note, this is not an exhaustive list of all our peer reviewed journals:

Best Databases

You can also search directly from our databases. It is a good idea to select "peer reviewed" from the filters on the left side of the database, once you have run a search. Here are some of the most useful databases for you to try for this project:

Types of resources

When evaluating resources, it is important to understand the difference between popular, scholarly, and trade journal articles.

A popular article is one in a magazine, written for entertainment for a general audience. The author’s credentials are unknown, if an author is provided.

A scholarly article, also known as a peer-reviewed or academic article, is written by an expert in that field. There might be a peer-reviewed date on the first page, letting you see when the journal accepted the article. These articles should be about a study accomplished by the authors, or a review of studies (known as a review article).

A trade journal article is within a trade journal/trade publication. These articles are written by experts in that industry, but often are not studies and are not considered scholarly. They provide news on the industry, explore trends, and gather expert opinions.

*Trade journals are the most popular for business and management topics. Expect many, if not most, of your resources to be from trade journals!

Scholarly, trade, or popular?

Is it a Scholarly, Trade, or Popular Publication?

Evaluation Criteria

Scholarly Journal (also called Peer Reviewed or Refereed)

Technical/Trade Journal

Popular Magazine

What’s in them?

Articles that present original research studies. Reviews of books relevant to scholars in the discipline.

Practical information for professionals in the field, including news, trends, and other updates.

Articles (usually brief) that feature a variety of topics -- including news, sports, short stories, art, fashion, etc.

 

Language is very technical, and article authors assume some scholarly background of the reader.

Articles are generally brief and the language is straightforward, but may contain professional jargon.

Bonus: Trade publications often include job listings.

Articles are written in simple language—no specialized knowledge is needed in order to read an article.

Examples

AJS, Bildhaan, JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, Social Science Quarterly

Architectural Record, Ceramics Monthly, The Police Chief, Instructor

Rolling Stone, The Economist, Time, Vogue, Sports Illustrated, and Psychology Today.

Who writes for them?

An expert or team of experts in the particular topic of study (Ph.D., researcher, or other scholar).

Professionals or experts in the field.

Writers, usually professional journalists, who are not necessarily experts on the article's topic.

 

Author’s credentials are usually listed with article.

Author’s credentials are usually listed with article.

Author’s information is often listed on the editorial page of the magazine. Sometimes the authors are not named.

Do they cite their sources?

Sources and references are always cited in scholarly articles—with footnotes or a bibliography.

Sometimes sources and bibliographies are given. This varies depending on the publication.

Articles rarely, if ever, cite resources in a bibliography.

What’s their purpose?

To make the information available to the rest of the scholarly world.

Report on trends in the profession and give practical advice to professionals and other interested readers.

To entertain, provide news, provide information about a hobby or special interest (e.g., gardening, motorcycles) promote a viewpoint, or sell a product.

What do they look like?

Scholarly journals generally have a basic, serious look and often contain many graphs and charts but few glossy pages or colorful pictures.

Trade journals often look more like popular magazines, with glossy pictures. Articles may have graphs and charts. The ads are usually related to the trade.

Glossy and attention-grabbing! Generally contain photos, perfume samples, and lots of advertisements.

What is their review process?

Scholarly articles go through a peer review (referee) process where other scholars in the field evaluate the content of the article. The articles are edited for grammar, format, etc.

Articles are reviewed by the magazine’s editorial staff, including copyediting for spelling, grammar, etc. Some trade journal articles go through some sort of peer review process—see the publication’s website (or editorial page) to find out.

Articles are reviewed by the magazine’s editorial staff, including copyediting for spelling, grammar, etc.

Chart from Hunter Library at Western Carolina University.  (Chart design inspired by many library charts including Colorado State University Libraries and Springfield Township Virtual Library. Explanation based on Cornell University Library "Skill Guide No. 20")